Corbett Kull

Co-founder + CEO

Corbett Kull is the co-founder and CEO of Tillable, his second entrepreneurial venture into the agricultural industry. A native of Lawrenceville, a small farming community in southeast Illinois, Corbett earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology and an MBA from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Corbett taught himself programming in the 1980s on a Commodore 64 computer, writing software to help his father in the insurance industry and later to help pay for college tuition. His experience includes 6 years at Motorola, where he helped develop the Iridium satellite communications system, and 13 years with mobile software provider PacketVideo, where he was senior vice president of worldwide sales and development.

A lot of people inherit farmland or buy it as an investment, and Tillable can be a valuable tool for improving the way that farmland is managed.

In 2013, Corbett launched 640 Labs, ultimately creating an open data platform for automatically collecting data from agricultural equipment. His team’s breakthrough technology—today known as the FieldView Drive—became one of the most rapidly adopted technological innovations in agriculture. The company was acquired by Climate Corporation in December 2014.

At Tillable, he is extending what he learned at 640 Labs to the farmland rental market. Specifically, Tillable is addressing two key industry problems: helping landowners make sure they’re getting market value for their land, and helping farmers get access to more land and expand.

Despite all the precision ag tools being used today, everyone seems to have forgotten about the landowners. That is something that I'm hoping Tillable can solve.

“We’ve seen the influence of digital platforms and marketplaces on so many aspects of life, and it just seemed like there’s got to be a better way to manage farmland. It is such a great investment, and it is so important for farmers,” Corbett says. Through Tillable, he hopes landowners can build stronger bonds not only with their land, but also with farmers.